disinformation Russia techniques primer

Excellent primer on political warfare and disinformation


Eric Garland Link

Competitive Futures is doing more security risk analysis for clients as the tensions increase between Russia and NATO allied countries. The global strategic trend of greatest importance has been the revelation that Russia has developed political warfare and disinformation to a higher level than ever seen.

Now that it has been weaponized against the United States and its European allies, this tension will eventually result in changes to the global security environment.

For more information on how political/hybrid warfare of the Russian style is currently being deployed, we highly recommend this primer by Citizen Lab.

PART 1: HOW TAINTED LEAKS ARE MADE describes a successful phishing campaign against David Satter, a high-profile journalist. We demonstrate how material obtained during this campaign was selectively released with falsifications to achieve propaganda aims. We then highlight a similar case stemming from an operation against an international grantmaking foundation, headquartered in the United States, in which their internal documents were selectively released with modifications to achieve a disinformation end.  These “tainted leaks” were demonstrated by comparing original documents and emails with what Russia-linked groups later published.  We conclude that the tainting likely has roots in Russian domestic policy concerns, particularly around offsetting and discrediting what are perceived as “outside” or “foreign” attempts to destabilize or undermine the Putin regime.

PART 2: A TINY DISCOVERY describes how the operation against Satter led us to the discovery of a larger phishing operation, with over 200 unique targets. We identified these targets by investigating links created by the operators using the Tiny.cc link shortening service.  After highlighting the similarities between this campaign and those documented by previous research, we round out the picture on Russia-linked operations by showing how related campaigns that attracted recent media attention for operations during the 2016 United States presidential election also targeted journalists, opposition groups, and civil society.

PART 3: CONNECTIONS TO PUBLICLY REPORTED OPERATIONS outlines the connections between the campaigns we have documented and previous public reporting on Russia-linked operations. After describing overlaps among various technical indicators, we discuss the nuance and challenges surrounding attribution in relation to operations with a Russian nexus.

PART 4: DISCUSSION explores how phishing operations combined with tainted leaks were paired to monitor, seed disinformation, and erode trust within civil society. We discuss the implications of leak tainting and highlight how it poses unique and difficult threats to civil society.  We then address the often-overlooked civil society component of nation-state cyber espionage operations.